A Whale of a Story…Parallel Behaviors to Healthy Aging

During our March vacation in Hawaii, it took us very far from home  providing us the needed  separation and  escape from the rigors of our work; allowing us to just relax.healthy aging

I have learned from professional and personal experience, just how important it is to separate from work in order to return with a refreshed attitude and a reset perspective.  The travel need not be thousands of miles, but just far enough to disengage.

While in Hawaii, I  dusted off  my camera and allow my passion for photography to flourish; taking pictures of anything that caught my eye.  I was particularly captivated by the lush green colors of the volcanic created islands and the colors of the beautiful flowers.

The day to go whale watching arrived, we loaded the boat, and headed out to sea.  During the entire experience, I was consumed with excitement  waiting for whales to emerge from under water in anticipation of the sighting of a tale slapping, a water spout, or full breaching; simply amazing!

You might be wondering what my travels to Hawaii has to do with geriatrics and aging. I discovered that the native population of the islands goes back thousands of years.  In my book and blogs, when I refer to the acronym G.R.A.C.E., the R  is for Roots.  Suggesting, it is  very important to know your family’s medical history to incorporate that information, making any necessary life changes to insure living a long and healthy life. Furthermore, throughout my years in practice,  I have witnessed over and over again, the importance of how Companionship and Connections, (the C in GRACE) are necessary for healthy aging.

While on the whale watching tour, I observed a great deal about the behaviors of whales, especially with regards to  “their community“.  Whales are very much a part of and travel in Pods, keeping track of each other while competing for dominance to mate; a trait humans share. Whales, like humans, have a long life expectancy and they can copulate up until the age of 80 years old, illustrating that sexual appetite is not limited to just the young of either species. You see, Parallel Behaviors

One more Note on Living Longer…it is my belief that it is beneficial and essential for us all to reflect on what we have experienced in the past as we plan and set Goals for the future (the G in GRACE).

Do you know your ROOTS? What have you learned  about your heredity that can be applied to enhance your quality of life, so you live happy, healthier and longer? Leave a comment below and keep the conversation going!

Here’s To a Long & Healthy Life…

David Bernstein, MD
Author ~ Physician ~ Public Speaker

 

Author of I’ve Got Some Good News and Some Bad News, YOU’RE OLD”, Tales of a Geriatrician, What to Expect in Your 60’s, 70’s, 80’s and Beyond